Winemaking Costs

March 17, 2008 at 9:00 am (Kit Wine, Thoughts, Winemaking, Winemaking Tips) (, , , , , )

Besides being a die-hard do it yourselfer, I’m also quite frugal. I hate paying somebody $100 for a job I can easily do myself. I just can’t bring myself to pay $10 or $15 for a bottle of wine when I can make great wine for a fraction of that cost.

So what does it cost to make wine? Figuring the costs of a kit is pretty straight forward, these calculations are based on a 6-gallon batch producing 30 bottles of wine:

  • The kit itself – roughly $60 for a 7-liter kit. Double that for a 15-liter kit. The 7 or 15 is the amount of juice concentrate in the kit, they all make 6-gallons.
  • Bottles – if you are buying them, figure $1 per bottle. I’m partial to free.
  • Corks – these little buggers are expensive. You can pay 75¢ a piece for good cork. I buy synthetic corks in bulk and pay about 20¢ a piece.
  • Capsules – about 6¢ each, not including shipping.
  • Labels – I laser print my own, I’m past needed to impress anyone. My labels are essentially free.

Taking all of this into consideration, expect a 7-liter kit will run between $2.25 and $4.00 a bottle. The premium kits can run between $4.25 and $8.00 a bottle. As I’ve said before, I scrounge bottles and buy synthetic cork in bulk. I have no problem keeping my per bottle costs at the low end of the scale.

What about wine made from scratch? Here the costs vary quite a bit.

  • I found in my notes that I paid $14.50 for a case of 12 pints of blueberries. That works out to $29 for 18 lbs ($1/bottle). That year I could have picked them for $1.29/lb locally, but I missed the window. I will usually pay up to $50 for fruit, that works out to less than $2 per bottle for just the fruit.
  • Homemade wine needs yeast, yeast nutrient, sulfites, sorbate, enzymes, and often a sulfite test ampule or two. This adds roughly a dollar for chemicals and a dollar for each ampule to the total cost. If we round to $3, it works out to 10¢ a bottle.
  • Homemade wine needs sugar. My wife buys 5 lb bags for me when it’s on sale for about a dollar. Most recipes call for about 10 lbs in the fermenter, another 5 lbs or so for sweetening. That’s $3.00 or another 10¢ a bottle for those keeping score.
  • Corks and capsules again for about 30¢ a bottle.

You can see that the cost of the wine is basically the fruit plus about $1 per bottle in chemicals and closures.  So my advice to you is simple; pay for good fruit.  If you invested $90 in fruit, which is quite a bit of money, your per bottle cost is still only $4.

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